Slipper Making Workshop

Slipper Making Workshop

This Slipper Making Workshop, brought together 10 participants from Hopedale, Nunatsiavut for a hands-on workshop to learn about sewing Labrador Inuit-style slippers. For three weeks, community members aged 12+ met to work alongside and learn from a local elder and young seamstresses, not only about sewing this pair of slippers, but to develop the skills and knowledge to be able to continue sewing on their own time. Veronica, the workshop lead, identified that this workshop would be important because not many people, especially young people, in her community know how to sew and it is important to keep the traditional sewing practices alive. Additionally, this would provide a valuable opportunity for the participants to get to spend time and work with an elder of the community and share stories to learn more about one another.

About Veronica Flowers
Veronica, from Hopedale, Nunatsiavut, has been sewing since she was 11 years old. She first learned to sew from her grandmother and her friend Sarah. She took part in a community sewing circle in 2010, which was held by her nan and Sarah. She decided to take part in this workshop with her sister, Vanessa, and friend, Kim. They learned how to sew their own slippers, which were the first pair of slippers they ever made. Since then, Veronica has continued to practice the tradition of sewing. Now, she makes traditional slippers and mitts, as well as smaller items such as keychains and earrings. Last year, Veronica and her sister made their first pair of traditional black-bottom sealskin boots, with the help from nan, of course! Veronica is currently studying at Grenfell Campus, Memorial University in Corner Brook where she and her sister lead sewing workshops for the university students and staff. Veronica enjoys leading these workshops as she not only likes to share her knowledge with her community, but she likes to learn from them as well in the process!

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